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#endangered Instagram Story & Photos & Videos

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Latest #endangered Posts

  • Some quick progress pics of my current project. Drymarchon Couperi, the King of the Forest, the Eastern Indigo. This is a threatened species native to the southeastern portion of the US. These are the longest snake in the country, with the largest on record being 9.2 ft(2.8m). Unlike most species, the males(3.9-7.7ft/1.2-2.36m) of this species average at slightly larger than the females(3.6-6.6ft/1.1-2m). Their common name is derived from the iridescent ventral(belly) scales that can shine as a blackish-purple in bright light. Their dorsal(back) scales are a glossy black and some specimens have a tan to orange to red color on their throats, chins, and cheeks. Leave these beauties alone if you see them, they consume venomous snakes and have powerful jaws that can leave a nasty bite if provoked.
  • Some quick progress pics of my current project. Drymarchon Couperi, the King of the Forest, the Eastern Indigo. This is a threatened species native to the southeastern portion of the US. These are the longest snake in the country, with the largest on record being 9.2 ft(2.8m). Unlike most species, the males(3.9-7.7ft/1.2-2.36m) of this species average at slightly larger than the females(3.6-6.6ft/1.1-2m). Their common name is derived from the iridescent ventral(belly) scales that can shine as a blackish-purple in bright light. Their dorsal(back) scales are a glossy black and some specimens have a tan to orange to red color on their throats, chins, and cheeks. Leave these beauties alone if you see them, they consume venomous snakes and have powerful jaws that can leave a nasty bite if provoked.
  •  6  1 20 January, 2019
  • Happy Penguin Awareness Day!

    Did you know there are 17 different species of penguins in the world? It’s true, and they all live in the southern hemisphere (even though there are penguins on the Galapagos Islands which technically extends slightly north of the equator, penguins are given the distinction of being southern hemisphere birds). While most people associate penguins with cold weather, not all penguins prefer the frigid temperatures. Yes, it’s true that penguins, like the Emperor, prefer the frigid temperatures of Antarctica, but many penguins live in much more temperate climates. The species we have at the NEW Zoo, for example, is the African Penguin. These penguins are found of the southwestern coast of Africa and live in nests they build on the beach.

    Unfortunately, the African Penguin’s most dangerous predators are humans. In addition to stealing the African Penguin’s eggs as a delicacy, humans are also destroying the nesting grounds by over-harvesting the guano the penguins use to build their nests to sell as fertilizer, leaving them without a safe place to make their homes. Where once there were over one million breeding pairs of penguins, now there are only about 25,000. The NEW Zoo has been actively involved in conservation efforts, along with other AZA-accredited zoos and aquariums to help restore the African Penguin population through the building and placement of artificial nests for the penguins in South Africa as well as through educating local people about the value and importance of African Penguins.

    We hope you will celebrate all the world’s penguins with us today on Penguin Awareness Day!
  • Happy Penguin Awareness Day!

Did you know there are 17 different species of penguins in the world? It’s true, and they all live in the southern hemisphere (even though there are penguins on the Galapagos Islands which technically extends slightly north of the equator, penguins are given the distinction of being southern hemisphere birds). While most people associate penguins with cold weather, not all penguins prefer the frigid temperatures. Yes, it’s true that penguins, like the Emperor, prefer the frigid temperatures of Antarctica, but many penguins live in much more temperate climates. The species we have at the NEW Zoo, for example, is the African Penguin. These penguins are found of the southwestern coast of Africa and live in nests they build on the beach.

Unfortunately, the African Penguin’s most dangerous predators are humans. In addition to stealing the African Penguin’s eggs as a delicacy, humans are also destroying the nesting grounds by over-harvesting the guano the penguins use to build their nests to sell as fertilizer, leaving them without a safe place to make their homes. Where once there were over one million breeding pairs of penguins, now there are only about 25,000. The NEW Zoo has been actively involved in conservation efforts, along with other AZA-accredited zoos and aquariums to help restore the African Penguin population through the building and placement of artificial nests for the penguins in South Africa as well as through educating local people about the value and importance of African Penguins.

We hope you will celebrate  all the world’s penguins with us today on Penguin Awareness Day!
  •  6  1 20 January, 2019
  • Well today is another re-post and actually is my birthday today (woooh 🥳), but this picture is a throw back to my time spent in Namibia. Definitely the best experience of my life. Having the opportunity to photograph this beautiful African wild dog (painted wolf, whatever you wish to name them) is something I’ll never forget. This was actually my first week of using a DSLR and is where I fell in love with wildlife photography. If only I had the knowledge and beast of a lens I have now. We will meet again Africa.
  • Well today is another re-post and actually is my birthday today (woooh 🥳), but this picture is a throw back to my time spent in Namibia. Definitely the best experience of my life. Having the opportunity to photograph this beautiful African wild dog (painted wolf, whatever you wish to name them) is something I’ll never forget. This was actually my first week of using a DSLR and is where I fell in love with wildlife photography. If only I had the knowledge and beast of a lens I have now. We will meet again Africa.
  •  62  3 20 January, 2019
  • There is little in nature to match the the fixed stare of a black #rhino , they are truly amazing animals! 💚🦏❤️ #rhinolivesmatter
  • There is little in nature to match the the fixed stare of a black #rhino , they are truly amazing animals! 💚🦏❤️ #rhinolivesmatter
  •  103  5 20 January, 2019
  • A smiling, endangered dugong in the Red Sea, where only 2000 are estimated to survive, one of the smallest populations on the planet.
    Gorgeous photo, generously shared with us by @gv_underwaterphotography.

    Learn more at SaveTheDugong.org
  • A smiling, endangered dugong in the Red Sea, where only 2000 are estimated to survive, one of the smallest populations on the planet. 
Gorgeous photo, generously shared with us by @gv_underwaterphotography.

Learn more at SaveTheDugong.org
  •  103  4 20 January, 2019
  • Dugong mother and baby playing around in the waters of Vanuatu, where they're endangered, as they are throughout the Pacific.
    Outstanding video generously shared with us by @wandooanderson.
    Learn more at SaveTheDugong.org

    #SaveTheDugong
  • Dugong mother and baby playing around in the waters of Vanuatu, where they're endangered, as they are throughout the Pacific.
Outstanding video generously shared with us by @wandooanderson. 
Learn more at SaveTheDugong.org

#SaveTheDugong
  •  79  6 20 January, 2019
  • Let’s help stop shark finning by clicking the link in @jim_abernethy’s bio.
    URGENT CALL TO ACTION TO HELP SHARKS!
    Why is this shark smiling ? 🦈 Legislation is currently being filed in Florida to ensure the State will no longer support and participate in the global trade of shark fins, a trade that is devastating shark populations around the world at a rate that is leading to the extinction of many shark species.

    The trade continues to thrive despite regulations that prohibit the act of “finning” or requirements to “land sharks whole/fins attached”. Both provisions leave the door wide open to the continued targeting of sharks for their fins, whether they are finned at sea, illegally, or finned after they are landed. Enforcement is complicated and beyond the capacity of most agencies. As long as fins can be freely sold and transported, it is nearly impossible to curb finning and the illegal fin trade.

    There is little public outrage because the wholesale slaughter of sharks takes place out of sight. Most citizens are shocked to find out that their own home state enables the trade of fins. And most of them vehemently oppose this and want it stopped. Florida is surrounded by the sea and it’s tourism and fishing economy depends on the ocean. If this bill passes, the State will be a shining example for conservation and protection of sharks, rather than a passive participant in the fin trade.

    In an ideal world we would follow sustainable management plans of all fisheries, around the globe. But that is unfortunately an unrealistic dream at this point. Sharks are being taken at a highly unsustainable rate and we must act with measures that are practical and enforceable, such as a prohibition on the sale and trade of shark fins.

    Since Texas and all the West Coast states have banned the sale and import/export of fins, Florida has become the hub for the trade of fins in the US. By allowing this to continue, Florida is supporting the global trade of shark fins.

    To show the legislature how important this issue is, we need YOUR HELP! Please click the link in my bio to add your name. @jim_abernethy @sharkallies @sealegacy @wildlifevoiceinc
  • Let’s help stop shark finning by clicking the link in @jim_abernethy’s bio. 
URGENT CALL TO ACTION TO HELP SHARKS!
Why is this shark smiling ? 🦈 Legislation is currently being filed in Florida to ensure the State will no longer support and participate in the global trade of shark fins, a trade that is devastating shark populations around the world at a rate that is leading to the extinction of many shark species.

The trade continues to thrive despite regulations that prohibit the act of “finning” or requirements to “land sharks whole/fins attached”. Both provisions leave the door wide open to the continued targeting of sharks for their fins, whether they are finned at sea, illegally, or finned after they are landed. Enforcement is complicated and beyond the capacity of most agencies. As long as fins can be freely sold and transported, it is nearly impossible to curb finning and the illegal fin trade.

There is little public outrage because the wholesale slaughter of sharks takes place out of sight. Most citizens are shocked to find out that their own home state enables the trade of fins. And most of them vehemently oppose this and want it stopped. Florida is surrounded by the sea and it’s tourism and fishing economy depends on the ocean. If this bill passes, the State will be a shining example for conservation and protection of sharks, rather than a passive participant in the fin trade.

In an ideal world we would follow sustainable management plans of all fisheries, around the globe. But that is unfortunately an unrealistic dream at this point. Sharks are being taken at a highly unsustainable rate and we must act with measures that are practical and enforceable, such as a prohibition on the sale and trade of shark fins.

Since Texas and all the West Coast states have banned the sale and import/export of fins, Florida has become the hub for the trade of fins in the US. By allowing this to continue, Florida is supporting the global trade of shark fins.

To show the legislature how important this issue is, we need YOUR HELP! Please click the link in my bio to add your name. @jim_abernethy @sharkallies @sealegacy @wildlifevoiceinc
  •  42  3 20 January, 2019